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Another hit at Lamb’s Players

By Charlene Baldridge | Theater Review

On the heels of its magnificent “Shadowlands,” Lamb’s Players Theatre in Coronado continues its string of extraordinary productions with the San Diego premiere of Lauren Gunderson’s “Silent Sky,” an absolutely delectable, mind-expanding examination of the early days of women in astronomy.

The most-produced living American playwright in 2016, Gunderson has several works seen or about to be seen in San Diego theaters, among them “Emilie: La Marquise du Chatelet …” at New Village Arts last season, and “The Revolutionists” to be seen at Moxie Theatre in May.

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Bringing the joy of reading to children

Posted: May 5th, 2017 | Communities, Feature, News, North Park, Top Story | No Comments

By Cynthia Robertson

If it’s the first Tuesday of the month, it’s time for Traveling Stories at Waypoint Public in North Park.

From 5 to 7 p.m., children have their own happy hours with a volunteer reading to the kids. In a back corner of the popular restaurant, located on the southwest corner of 30th Street and North Park Way, the kids have their own fenced-in play area with lots of books and volunteers to read with them.

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Uptown Briefs – May 5, 2017

Posted: May 5th, 2017 | News, Opinion & News, Uptown Briefs | No Comments

Thousands walk in People’s Climate March Thousand of San Diegans participated in the People’s Climate March on April 29, calling on local leaders to “support a just and rapid transition to 100 percent clean energy and to oppose the Trump administration’s rollback of climate policies the protect the planet,” according to a news release by climate change action group San Diego 350. The local event began with a rally at Waterfront Park in front of […]

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Legend among us

Posted: April 21st, 2017 | Arts & Entertainment, Feature, Top Story | No Comments

By Lucia Viti

Mario Torero is a legend. The artist, teacher, cultural historian and community activist has made a name for himself far beyond the streets of San Diego’s Chicano Park and Barrio Logan.

An international superstar determined to foster a global understanding of the artistic culture of the Latino/Chicano community, Torero travels the world painting larger-than-life murals. His vibrant, flamboyant and culturally expressive work can be found in Peru, Japan, Costa Rica, Spain and the Czech Republic. And in the Library of Congress.

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Meal discoveries inside a liquor store

By Frank Sabatini Jr.

Other than ducking into Fiori’s Pizza & Deli for an occasional Lotto ticket and a fast slice of pizza, I never focused much on the menu board hanging over the food counter until recently.

To my surprise, the nearly 40-year-old liquor store conceals a grill and deep-fryer in a room behind the pizza ovens, which means items such as burgers, Philly cheesesteaks, Buffalo chicken wings, fried shrimp and veal-lamb gyros are sold here.

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‘Skeleton Crew’ shines

By Charlene Baldridge | Theater Review

In association with Moxie Theatre, The Old Globe presents the West Coast premiere of Dominique Morisseau’s suspenseful coffee/locker room play, “Skeleton Crew,” through May 7 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre.

The work features a tight ensemble of four actors, possibly the best in regards to chemistry and balance that the Globe has assembled in many years.

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University Heights to mark iconic street sign’s 20th year

By SDCNN Staff The University Heights Community Association (UHCA), Park Boulevard merchants and residents, friends, family and neighbors will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the University Heights street sign on Park Boulevard on Saturday, April 29, from 5-8 p.m. Called “20 Electrifying Years,” the celebration will kick off with an opening event at 5 p.m. under the sign, in front of Park & Rec at 4612 Park Blvd., with appearances by County Supervisor Ron Roberts […]

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Springtime for the Craftsman

Posted: April 21st, 2017 | Columns, Feature, HouseCalls, News, Top Story | No Comments

By Michael Good | HouseCalls

As historian and preservationist Robert Winter, author of “Craftsman Style,” likes to say, the Craftsman Revival has lasted longer than the original Craftsman movement.

The first Craftsman bungalows began appearing in San Diego around 1905. By the time the United States entered World War I, in 1917, the heyday of the Craftsman was over.

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Portraits of the homeless

Posted: April 21st, 2017 | Arts & Entertainment, Feature, Top Story | No Comments

By Lucia Viti

Neil Shigley is more than an artist. The painter, printmaker and educator is an advocate for what he calls the “invisible people” and what society labels the “homeless.”

Incredibly moving, at times haunting, large-scale print images capture his vision of the homeless “human figure.” Shigley shares the plight of the homeless through an artistry that exhibits its face.

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